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Unmanned Aircraft training with Wyoming Highway Patrol

There are a number of variations of small unmanned aircraft systems that exist and many are equipped with state of the art cameras, sensors, and user interfaces. People flying drones are responsible for knowing rules and regulations to ensure recreational use does not inadvertently pose a threat to military operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Lt. Col. Matt Pignataro, Commander, 790th Missile Security Forces Squadron.)

There are a number of variations of small unmanned aircraft systems that exist and many are equipped with state of the art cameras, sensors, and user interfaces. People flying drones are responsible for knowing rules and regulations to ensure recreational use does not inadvertently pose a threat to military operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Lt. Col. Matt Pignataro, Commander, 790th Missile Security Forces Squadron.)

F.E. WARREN AIR FORCE BASE, Wyo. --

The 90th Missile Security Operations Squadron will train members of Wyoming Highway Patrol on the use of unarmed, unmanned aircraft on Feb. 5 to Feb. 9, 2021, at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming.

 

“Once they get familiar with the aircraft, they can start flying,” said Tech. Sgt. Nathan Grier, Counter Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems and Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems manager, 90th Missile Security Operations Squadron.

 

Wyoming Highway Patrol plans on using their training to incorporate the unmanned aircraft into their operations.

 

“If there’s a traffic or train accident, they will be able to get a bird’s eye view of the incident,” said Grier.

 

The training helps to maintain the relationship between F.E. Warren AFB and Wyoming Highway Patrol.

 

“When they have incidents off base, they can rely on us for assistance,” said Grier. “If they don’t have a certain capability, they will feel confident requesting us.”

 

F.E. Warren has worked with Wyoming Highway Patrol in the past and has hosted symposiums with law enforcement groups from Colorado.

 

“We get together with local law enforcement, we fly around, and we show them our capabilities,” said Grier.

 

The relationship between the base and local law enforcement allows Security Forces to offer and provide SUAS technology to civilian law enforcement that may not otherwise be available to them, according to Grier.