HomeNews

News Search

Biomedical Sciences Corps Appreciation Week 2017

Natasha Kalda, 90th Medical Support Squadron pharmacist, fulfills prescriptions at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Jan. 20, 2017. The Air Force celebrates Biomedical Science Corps Appreciation Week Jan. 23 to 27. The Biomedical Science Corps is comprised of 15 medical AFSCs of which 10 are represented at F.E. Warren. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

Natasha Kalda, 90th Medical Support Squadron pharmacist, fulfills prescriptions at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Jan. 20, 2017. The Air Force celebrates Biomedical Science Corps Appreciation Week Jan. 23 to 27. The Biomedical Science Corps is comprised of 15 medical AFSCs of which 10 are represented at F.E. Warren. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

Airman 1st Class Rigel Villegas, 90th Medical Operations Squadron physical medicine apprentice, progresses through passive range of motion exercises with Capt. Jason Jordon, 90th Operations Support Squadron ICBM weapons and tactics planner at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Jan. 20, 2017. The Air Force celebrates Biomedical Science Corps Appreciation Week Jan. 23 to 27. The Biomedical Science Corps is comprised of 15 medical AFSCs of which 10 are represented at F.E. Warren. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

Airman 1st Class Rigel Villegas, 90th Medical Operations Squadron physical medicine apprentice, progresses through passive range of motion exercises with Capt. Jason Jordon, 90th Operations Support Squadron ICBM weapons and tactics planner at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Jan. 20, 2017. The Air Force celebrates Biomedical Science Corps Appreciation Week Jan. 23 to 27. The Biomedical Science Corps is comprised of 15 medical AFSCs of which 10 are represented at F.E. Warren. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

Airman 1st class Alvin Daniels, 90th Medical Operations Squadron public Health technician, performs a lighted ear inspection on a patient at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Jan. 20, 2017. The Air Force celebrates Biomedical Science Corps Appreciation Week Jan. 23 to 27. The Biomedical Science Corps is comprised of 15 medical Air Force Specialty Codes of which 10 are represented at F.E. Warren. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

Airman 1st class Alvin Daniels, 90th Medical Operations Squadron public Health technician, performs a lighted ear inspection on a patient at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Jan. 20, 2017. The Air Force celebrates Biomedical Science Corps Appreciation Week Jan. 23 to 27. The Biomedical Science Corps is comprised of 15 medical Air Force Specialty Codes of which 10 are represented at F.E. Warren. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

Shannon Hensley, 90th Medical Support Squadron laboratory technician supervisor, looks at lab samples through a microscope at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Jan. 20, 2017. The Air Force celebrates Biomedical Science Corps Appreciation Week Jan. 23 to 27. The Biomedical Science Corps is comprised of 15 medical AFSCs of which 10 are represented at F.E. Warren. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

Shannon Hensley, 90th Medical Support Squadron laboratory technician supervisor, looks at lab samples through a microscope at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Jan. 20, 2017. The Air Force celebrates Biomedical Science Corps Appreciation Week Jan. 23 to 27. The Biomedical Science Corps is comprised of 15 medical AFSCs of which 10 are represented at F.E. Warren. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

Capt. Page Bosch, Medical Operations Squadron optometrist, performs eye tests on a patient at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Jan. 20, 2017. The Air Force celebrates Biomedical Science Corps Appreciation Week Jan. 23 to 27. The Biomedical Science Corps is comprised of 15 medical AFSCs of which 10 are represented at F.E. Warren. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

Capt. Page Bosch, Medical Operations Squadron optometrist, performs eye tests on a patient at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Jan. 20, 2017. The Air Force celebrates Biomedical Science Corps Appreciation Week Jan. 23 to 27. The Biomedical Science Corps is comprised of 15 medical AFSCs of which 10 are represented at F.E. Warren. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

F.E. WARREN AIR FORCE BASE, Wyo. --

The Air Force recognizes the achievements of the men and women who comprise the Biomedical Sciences Corps by designating Jan. 23 - 27 as BSC Appreciation Week.

 

The BSC's roots date back to 1917, when the Sanitary Corps was established to combat infectious diseases. The Army Medical Administrative Corps followed three years later. In 1949, the Air Force Medical Service was officially established. The AFMS continued to expand over the next two decades, and in 1965, the BSC was born. Over the past 51 years, the BSC continued to expand its range of personnel to include a wide variety of medically-trained professionals.

 

To date, the BSC's mission is to enhance Air Force combat capability and effectiveness by providing world-class customer service and scientific expertise, resulting in peak force performance, productivity and quality healthcare for our beneficiary population. Comprised of 15 primary specialty codes, the BSC is the most diverse corps in the Air Force Medical Service. The BSC motto is: United in the mission.

 

With 2,400 officers, supported by 5,800 enlisted members in parallel career fields, BSC members can be found at more than 70 locations around the world and also in multiple settings. The BSC encompasses physical therapy, optometry, podiatry, physician assistants, audiology, speech pathology, clinical psychology, clinical social work, occupational therapy, aerospace and operational physiology, dietetics, bioenvironmental engineers, public health, medical entomology, pharmacy, biomedical laboratory, healthcare facilities architects/engineers and health & medical physics.

 

Below is information on all the BSC services here on base.

 

AEROSPACE AND OPERATIONAL PHYSIOLOGY

This recently added mission of the 90th Medical Operations Squadron involves human performance optimization that can be performed throughout the wing. If requested by a commander, the office analyzes the inner workings of that office and its people to calculate their work performance and offer suggestions for an improved work center. Soon, their capability will involve being able to work with the helicopter squadron aircrew on training with scenarios like hypoxia, hyperventilation, stress, fatigue, team dynamics and communication. Another aspect of their job additionally when a mishap occurs, they are often called to serve as the human factors representative on the Safety Investigation Board or the Accident Investigation Board. 

 

BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TEAM

The Bioenvironmental Engineering team's mission is to advise commanders at all levels on health threats and necessary controls to ensure illnesses are prevented before they occur. General program areas include occupational health, environmental health, radiation health and contingency response. BE ensures the quality of the installation drinking water. Aside from day-to-day program responsibilities, it has a significant role in the installation disaster response mission.  BE is a member of the emergency response force for a wide range of incidents and accidents, including natural disasters, aircraft accidents, hazardous material spills, terrorist attacks and chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear events.

 

“We ensure that all the work centers are following occupational safety and health administration and environmental protection agency regulations when they are doing their work,” said Staff Sgt. John Zuhlke, 90th MDOS readiness and contingency operations supervisor. “Our key part in emergency response procedures involves accidents out in the missile field. We would respond to help in any way possible and detect if there is any biological or radiological threats in the area.”

 

CLINICAL LABORATORY

The Clinical Laboratory provides services for beneficiaries. The laboratory collects and tests patient specimens upon authorized request from a patients Primary Care Manager. Test results are returned directly to the ordering PCM. The PCM will contact the patient if the results are abnormal.

 

“As an extension of the doctors, we help them detect anything that is wrong with the patient’s specimen that we collect,” said Jason Venable, 90th Medical Support Squadron clinical laboratory NCO in charge. “We also take care of Airmen’s families so the military member doesn’t have to worry, knowing that their spouse or child will be taken care of by us here at the lab and at the clinic in general.”

 

MENTAL HEALTH TEAM

The mental health flight stands ready to support the Mighty Ninety mission by strengthening the resiliency and well-being of all service members and their families assigned to the installation. Some of the services provided at the mental health clinic are individual therapy, medication consultations, anger management classes, deployment support, suicide prevention training and traumatic stress response briefings. In addition to active duty, the clinic also offers treatment and support to adult family members as well.

 

OPTOMETRY TEAM

The 90th MDOS’s primary function is to provide vision care for active duty, retirees and dependents. The team can perform refractive surgery consults and post-operative care, occupational laser eye exams, treat dry eye disorders and diagnose and treat computer vision syndrome.

 

PHARMACY TEAM

The pharmacy provides safe and effective medications to the local population and assists the clinical staff with appropriate drug therapy. With medication, the beneficiaries can maintain their health, prepare for deployment with the necessary medications or recover from an illness as fast as possible in order to return to duty and ultimately accomplish their mission. The pharmacy fills over 400 prescriptions every day. From the time the prescription is requested to the time it has been picked up, it has gone through multiple processes to ensure it's safe, appropriate and accurate.

 

PHYSICAL THERAPY TEAM

The Physical Therapy Clinic provides evaluation and treatment of neuromuscular and musculoskeletal conditions to improve movement and function and to maximize patient potential for an active and independent lifestyle. Priority is given to active duty Air Force members assigned to F.E. Warren, with space available services provided to TRICARE Prime enrollees.

 

“The office is composed of health promotions, dietitians and physical therapists taking care of muscular and skeletal issues,” said Maj. William Garlisi, 90th MDOS physical medicine flight commander. “We ensure the Mighty Ninety is fit to fight and do what is necessary to recover from an injury and do their mission.”

 

PUBLIC HEALTH TEAM

Public Health provides the following services for active duty personnel: pre- and post-deployment medical screening, annual preventive health assessments and occupational health and safety monitoring. Additional services for all beneficiaries include: food safety and public facility sanitation, communicable disease prevention and monitoring, as well as travel medicine services (specific country vaccination requirements, information regarding current disease outbreaks, etc.).

 

PERSONNEL RELIABILITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM

The Personnel Reliability Assurance Program Clinic provides care for personnel on the Personnel Reliability Program and with Arming and Use of Force status, with the exception of those who are on flying or special status. The PRAP clinic provides routine, acute, preventive and wellness services, as well as minor surgeries. In addition to providing medical care, the clinic is responsible for reviewing all medical records for PRP certification. Lastly, the clinic informs the certifying officials and commanders of any changes to a member's ability to arm or perform PRP duties.