HomeNews

News Search

Breast cancer survivor, speaks at luncheon

Shelia Coffey, a recent survivor of breast cancer, stands and speaks to a group of people about the hardships of breast cancer and her experience with the disease, Oct. 24, 2018, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo.  After skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

Shelia Coffey, a recent survivor of breast cancer, stands and speaks to a group of people about the hardships of breast cancer and her experience with the disease, Oct. 24, 2018, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. After skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

John Coffey, 90th Civil Engineer Squadron carpenter, stands and speaks to a group of people about the hardships of breast cancer on a family, Oct. 24, 2018, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. After skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

John Coffey, 90th Civil Engineer Squadron carpenter, stands and speaks to a group of people about the hardships of breast cancer on a family, Oct. 24, 2018, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. After skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

F.E. WARREN AIR FORCE BASE, Wyo. --

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and it serves as a chance to raise awareness about the importance of screening and early detection of breast cancer.

About 1 in 8 women born today in the United States will get breast cancer at some point during their life. After skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. Also, 2,240 men in the U.S. are expected to get breast cancer this year.

To raise awareness, the 90th Medical Group held weekly events in honor of breast cancer survivors and fighters throughout the month of October.

The final event was a luncheon Oct. 24, 2018, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base.

Shelia Coffey, a recent survivor of breast cancer, came to speak to the attendees of the event.

“For those who are supporting someone going through breast cancer, they don’t need advice, they just need you to be there and listen,” Shelia said. “It’s a hard road to go down, but with faith in God, you too can make it through the trial.”

John Coffey, Shelia’s husband, also spoke to the group.

“Buckle up. You’re in for a wild ride,” John said. “This is a very hard problem to take on. Just be there for your spouse and be ready for the rough roads ahead.”

The event concluded with a few words from Col. Christine Hackett, 90th MDG commander, thanking everyone for attending.

Breast cancer is a very serious disease, but early detection leads to better odds of curability. Here are a few tips for detecting early warning signs provided by the National Health Information Center.

For Women:

· Ages 40 to 49: Talk with your doctor about when to start receiving and how often you need a mammogram.

· Ages 50 to 74:  The recommendation is to get a mammogram every 2 years. You may start earlier or get one more often. Talk to your provider to decide what is right for you.

For Men:

· Any change in the breast, chest area or nipple can be a warning sign, such as:

· Lump, hard knot or thickening in the breast (usually painless, but may be tender)

· Dimpling, puckering or redness of the skin of the breast

· Itchy, scaly, sore or rash on the nipple

· Inverted nipple or other parts of the breast