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Self-aid Buddy-care: life and death

Senior Airman Timothy Cruz, 90th Comptroller Squadron financial services technician, has his arm wrapped with a bandage as part of a Self-Aid Buddy care class, Aug. 10, 2018, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. Before anyone is allowed to go on a deployment, they must first go through a course on SABC. The training consists of classroom instruction and hands-on tactics. The purpose of the course is to provide Airmen with the basic knowledge of injury care. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

Senior Airman Timothy Cruz, 90th Comptroller Squadron financial services technician, has his arm wrapped with a bandage as part of a Self-Aid Buddy care class, Aug. 10, 2018, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. Before anyone is allowed to go on a deployment, they must first go through a course on SABC. The training consists of classroom instruction and hands-on tactics. The purpose of the course is to provide Airmen with the basic knowledge of injury care. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

90th Missile Wing Airmen stand listening to the Self-Aid Buddy Care instructor Aug. 10, 2018, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. SABC can be a lifesaving tool in a deployed location or in the back yard. It is important for everyone to receive the necessary required refresher courses because the skills may be used at any time. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

90th Missile Wing Airmen stand listening to the Self-Aid Buddy Care instructor Aug. 10, 2018, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. SABC can be a lifesaving tool in a deployed location or in the back yard. It is important for everyone to receive the necessary required refresher courses because the skills may be used at any time. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

F.E. WARREN AIR FORCE BASE, Wyo. --

On the battle field, your buddy is your best friend. You may have to depend on that person to save your life. That is where self-aid buddy care comes into play.

Before anyone is allowed to go on a deployment, they must first go through a course on SABC. The training consists of classroom instruction and hands-on tactics, and its purpose is to provide Airmen with the basic knowledge of injury care.

Recently a training was held at the F.E. Warren AFB Clinic. This class had six participants and was the first class for Tech. Sgt. Devin Long, explosive ordnance disposal, NCO in charge of training.

“I’ve been doing SABC since I joined the Air Force,” said Long. “It may be a long class to sit through, but it is vitally important that everyone takes it because SABC could be the difference between life and death.”

SABC can be used in any scenario, whether deployed or not.

“This stuff can come into play if you fall down a ladder," said Long. "You'll know how to take care of the wound, potentially saving your life or someone else’s. You never know when you'll be in a situation when you can use it."

When deployed those trained on SABC act as first responders until a medic makes it to the scene.

Here at F.E. Warren, Tech. Sgt. Renelyn Pagan, 90th Medical Operation Squadron flight chief, is the 90th Missile Wing SABC training coordinator.

“When you deploy and go out on a mission you will have one to three medics with you,” said Pagan. “That is why SABC is vital, if the medics are all tied up helping other people there needs to be someone else there to at least administer first aid.”

F.E. Warren can hold more class with more instructors. To volunteer to become an instructor call: 307-773-3039.