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Airmen take on Marine Combat Fitness Test

Airman from the 890th Missile Security Forces Squadron on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. start an 880 yard run as part of the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Fitness Test Aug. 9, 2018. The test consists of three events: an 880-yard run in boots and utility uniforms, ammo can lifts and a maneuver-under-fire obstacle course. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

Airman from the 890th Missile Security Forces Squadron on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. start an 880 yard run as part of the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Fitness Test Aug. 9, 2018. The test consists of three events: an 880-yard run in boots and utility uniforms, ammo can lifts and a maneuver-under-fire obstacle course. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

Airman from the 890th Missile Security Forces Squadron lift a 30 pound ammo can above their head as many times as possible in two minutes as part of the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Fitness Test Aug. 9, 2018 on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. The CFT is a test designed to simulate combat scenarios while also testing the capabilities of the U.S. military’s front line war fighters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

Airman from the 890th Missile Security Forces Squadron lift a 30 pound ammo can above their head as many times as possible in two minutes as part of the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Fitness Test Aug. 9, 2018 on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. The CFT is a test designed to simulate combat scenarios while also testing the capabilities of the U.S. military’s front line war fighters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

Maj. David Lycan, 890th Missile Security Forces Squadron commander, performs a low crawl as part of the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Fitness Test Aug. 9, 2018 on F.E. Warren Air Forces Base, Wyo. While the Marines have to complete this test along with their annual physical fitness test, the Air Force doesn’t have a test in place to simulate battlefield scenarios, taking on the Marine CFT gives Airmen the opportunity to demonstrate their capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

Maj. David Lycan, 890th Missile Security Forces Squadron commander, performs a low crawl as part of the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Fitness Test Aug. 9, 2018 on F.E. Warren Air Forces Base, Wyo. While the Marines have to complete this test along with their annual physical fitness test, the Air Force doesn’t have a test in place to simulate battlefield scenarios, taking on the Marine CFT gives Airmen the opportunity to demonstrate their capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Braydon Williams)

F.E. WARREN AIR FORCE BASE, Wyo. --

Defenders with the 890th Missile Security Forces Squadron on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming, took on the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Fitness Test August 9, 2018, on the base parade field.

 

The CFT is a test designed to simulate combat scenarios while also testing the capabilities of the U.S. Military’s front line war fighters. It consists of three events: an 880-yard run in boots and utility uniforms, ammo can lifts and a maneuver-under-fire obstacle course.

 

“Taking on the Marine’s CFT is a great challenge, because it tests our capabilities as Air Force defenders,” said, Staff Sgt. Keith Valdez, 890th MSFS defender. “On top of that, it is a great way to bring our people closer together through competition, because competition is a great way to build morale.”

 

While the Marines have to complete this test along with their annual physical fitness test, the Air Force doesn’t have a test in place to simulate battlefield scenarios. Taking on the Marine CFT gives Airmen the opportunity to demonstrate their capabilities. 

 

“While being a great way to boost morale, this test also gives us a benchmark of how well we would perform if we are ever in a combat situation,” said Senior Airman Karina Hernandez, 890th MSFS. “As security forces, we have to be ready to defend at any time, and this will keep us ready.”

 

Defenders are the Air Force’s front line security, and with that, lethality is a must.

 

“Anytime you get a group together for any kind of physical fitness, it will inherently build morale,” said Col. Stacy Jo Huser, 90th Missile Wing commander. “Events like this are especially valuable for our defenders because it will ultimately increase their lethality.”