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New SARC for the Mighty Ninety family

The new 90th Missile Wing Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, Jill Randall, displays her going away gift April 30, 2015, from Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The gift signifies her time at Hill AFB; however, she now beings her new journey at F.E. Warren AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Malcolm Mayfield)

The new 90th Missile Wing Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, Jill Randall, displays her going away gift April 30, 2015, from Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The gift signifies her time at Hill AFB; however, she now beings her new journey at F.E. Warren AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Malcolm Mayfield)

Jill Randall, 90th Missile Wing Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, talks with runners prior to the Warren SAPR Awareness 5K Run April 24, 2015, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. The run was the first event held by Randall after her assumption of the position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Malcolm Mayfield)

Jill Randall, 90th Missile Wing Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, talks with runners prior to the Warren SAPR Awareness 5K Run April 24, 2015, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. The run was the first event held by Randall after her assumption of the position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Malcolm Mayfield)

F.E. WARREN AIR FORCE BASE, Wyo. --
Within the Air Force community, leadership puts in a large amount of resources to reinforce a zero tolerance environment when sexual assault is involved.

The Sexual Assault Response Coordinator office is the ambassador that keeps the Warren community educated on Sexual Assault Prevention and Response; however, their main mission here is being there for the Mighty Ninety team members.

"We're not just education and training and this is not a punitive office," said Jill Randall, 90th Missile Wing SARC. "This is centered on the victims."

Randall is Warren's new full-time SAPR representative and has taken the reigns from Master Sgt. Angela Clancy, 90th Maintenance Operations Support and SARC volunteer victim advocate, who managed the program after the previous SARC left November of 2014. To help the transition along Marti Salas, the SARC office's full-time victim advocate, will help provide the continuity for success.

To become a volunteer victim advocate a 40-hour training course is required and with very few individuals with the qualifications, Clancy was one of several volunteers with the knowledge and motivation to keep the program alive.

"Jill and Marti have such an enthusiasm to them, and they are just so relatable," Clancy said. "I think they're going to be able to develop this program in ways we haven't seen in many years."

As a prior enlisted member, Randall has a deep connection to the military community. After pursuing a master's degree in counseling psychology she quickly reentered the military work force, as a civilian.

"I wanted to work with the military community; that was my goal when I got my degree," Randall said. "As a dependent I received my degree at Aviano [Air Base], Italy, came back to the states and did all my internships. After that I got my job at the VA."

The Connecticut native was a full-time victim advocate at her previous base. Prior to that, she worked for the Department of Veteran Affairs specializing as a military sexual trauma therapist. Randall focuses on the Airmen and works to accomplish the mission of SAPR.

"I think this is a really important position and I'm glad to be able to serve the Airmen who need it," Randall said. "I am really excited. Since the slot has been empty for a while, it's like [I'm] getting off the ground running."

Although she's coming into the position at full sprint, she has an awesome support system.

"My husband has been so supportive; he retired from the military in May of 2014 and said, 'wherever your job takes us, I will support you,"' the mother of one said. "They have been so incredibly supportive of me in pursuing this and doing what I love to do. I couldn't imagine going through all this without them."

Being backed up by her family has given Randall the chance to dedicate herself completely to the task before her.

Randall said the moment she entered the position she was ready to tackle any challenges that came her way and help any way she could.

"The last thing that I want is for someone to need this and not have it. We are up and running as far as victim services go. I truly believe they always have been," Randall said.

The SARC's office is designed to help those in the Warren family through the challenges that sexual assault brings.

"Jill made a good point the other day when we were teaching [the First-Term Airman Course]," Clancy said. "[She said] I'm not on a witch hunt, this is all about education, respect and support."

As the SAPR representative, Clancy was open to answering what the community asked and Randall shares the same belief.

"I want to encourage anyone who has questions - anytime about anything - to call the SARC," Randall said.

Information provided to the SARC or victim advocate, remains confidential until the representatives are told otherwise by the victim.Information provided to the SARC or victim advocate, remains confidential until is otherwise told by the victim.

"I don't ever want someone to have an issue and not call for fear of reprisal," Randall said.

Sexual assault is a crime and the Sexual Assault Response Coordinator's office is here to help those affected along with helping the prevention of it all together.

Editor's note: If you have a question or need to talk to the F.E. Warren AFB SARC, a representative can be reached 24/7 at 307-773-7272.