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Graphic designer’s creativity expressed through work

Mary Fahrer, a graphic designer with Warren’s multimedia center, assists portions of her project through a laminator Oct. 25. In addition to a lamination machine, the multimedia office has several large printers with varied powers and functions for different types of products (Photo by Airman 1st Class Alex Martinez).

Mary Fahrer, a graphic designer with Warren’s multimedia center, assists portions of her project through a laminator Oct. 25. In addition to a lamination machine, the multimedia office has several large printers with varied powers and functions for different types of products (Photo by Airman 1st Class Alex Martinez).

F. E. Warren AFB, Wyo. -- To create a product, their work begins with a blank computer screen. As their minds ripen with ideas on what they want a product to look like, they know it has to be something new, something fresh, something that will sit on the edge of creativity while still keeping in mind what their customers want.

"Having customers happy with what you do for them is the most fulfilling part of the job," said Cindy Green, 90th Space Wing graphic designer.

The multimedia graphic designers create visual products for Warren events. Everything from retirement ceremony handouts to museum displays are created in their office.

"[The museum] has given us a lot of freedom to do some pretty neat stuff," said Mary Fahrer, a graphic designer with Warren's multimedia center.

They have helped the museum create map-light-boxes for identifying missile launch facilities, historic static displays and a detailed timeline of events at Warren and in the local area.

It's not uncommon for the graphic designers to be working multiple projects at the same time, requiring them to prioritize their jobs as best they can.

"We usually have a quick turn around on our products," Mrs. Fahrer said. "For example, if the Twentieth Air Force needs something, it's usually important, so we get that product out as quickly as we can."

Customers request their services by turning in work orders with details about the event, usually leaving the design elements to the designers.

"We're happy when we can create a product that's out of the norm," Mrs. Fahrer said. "We like to try new things, however, it's always about what the customer wants."

Sometimes the designers already have an idea as to what they want to create for a certain product, but in other instances, they must start from scratch.

"Colors are my first inspiration for a project," Mrs. Fahrer said.

She said certain products fit well with certain colors; for example, a chapel event she is currently working on will involve children, so bright colors that are attention grabbing and elements that are graphically pleasing will be necessary for the event.

"By the time I'm done with a product, I've adjusted so many things that it doesn't even look like what I first envisioned," Mrs. Fahrer said.

Displayed in many locations around base, the graphic designer's projects serve their purpose of advertising, informing and acting as modern day works of art.