Feature Search

Feature Comments Updated
1 ... 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 73
Landon Strand, 90th Medical Group, and Alexandra Ayub, 90th Force Support Squadron,  face off with pugil sticks over muddy water on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., as they take part in a jousting competition  Aug. 21, 2015. The two were taking part in Frontiercade, which is meant to give F.E. Warren Airmen and their families a day of games, sports and free food before the start of the new school year. (U.S. Air Force photos by R.J. Oriez/Released) Frontiercade Fun
Every year, for more than 20 years, the 90th Missile Wing takes a day off from its routine in order to have some fun, build camaraderie and let family members join in before the start of the local school year.The day is known as Frontiercade and this year it was held Aug. 21.Competitions range from volleyball to jousting with pugil sticks over a
0 8/27
2015
Senior Airman Zachary Pirrung, 90th MW Command Post senior emergency action controller, mans the command post at 12:54 a.m., Aug. 25, 2015. Pirrung was one half of the two-person team making up the night shift. A minimum of two individuals are required to always be available in the office 24/7, 365 days a year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Malcolm Mayfield) 90 @ Nite: Command Post
At the heart of Warren's communication network lies the 90th Missile Wing Command Post.  These Airmen cultivate a web of information and pump that information out to the needed experts day and night."We have a 24-hour mission here," said Master Sgt. Spencer Glipa, 90th MW Command Post superintendent. "We are the central point of contact for the
0 8/27
2015
Airman 1st Class Leslie Friestad, 90th Maintenance Operations Squadron, performs maintenance on a missile guidance set during missile maintenance training in the U-01 practice launch facility on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Aug. 4, 2014. The practice launch facility prepares Airmen for the rigorous maintenance they will have to routinely conduct on actual missiles as part of their duties. The Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center Force Improvement Program team observed a similar operation in an actual launch facility in June to see how AFNWC could better support the mission (U.S. Air Force photo by Lan Kim). Info exchange facilitates change
The Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center Force Improvement Program team is gaining knowledge through the exchange of information with units throughout the center, strengthening relationships with missile and bomber wing customers.In June, the AFNWC FIP team met with members of the 90th Missile Maintenance Squadron at F.E. Warren Air Force Base,
0 8/26
2015
Senior Airman Joseph Bates, 90th Logistics Readiness Squadron Traffic Control Function controller, checks a vehicle’s fluid levels Aug. 5, 2015, on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. Bates and his fellow TCF controllers often help out day shift vehicle operations Airmen by checking vehicles in addition to their TCF duties. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jason Wiese) 90 @ Nite: Transportation Control Function
Tracking travel in the 90th Missile Wing's 9,600-square-mile missile complex is a feat, especially considering Mighty Ninety Airmen travel more than 7 million miles annually to, and within, the field.The 90th Logistics Readiness Squadron performs several functions in support of this momentous undertaking. One important role is the 90th LRS
0 8/26
2015
Maj. Tom Perry and 1st Lt. Jonathon Powell, 320th Missile Squadron missile combat crew members, perform the daily missileer routines Aug. 21, 2015, inside a launch control center. Crews of two missileers man each launch control center for 24 hours before being replaced by another crew. (U.S. Air Force by Airman 1st Class Brandon Valle) 90 @ Nite: Missileers
Editor's note: This article is part of a weeklong series showcasing the Airmen who work night shifts.The 90th Operations Group controls 150 Minuteman III ICBMs, protecting America through nuclear deterrence. The missileers of the group's 319th, 320th, and the 321st Missile Squadrons ensure that mission is accomplished 24-hours a day, seven days a
0 8/25
2015
Staff Sgt. Sarah Cox and Airman 1st Class Austin Langlois, 90th Medical Operations Squadron Bioenvironmental Engineering technicians, run on a track on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., Aug. 19, 2015. Exercise is recommended by health experts, but over-exertion can lead to a painful condition called Rhabdomyolysis, which is the build up of intracellular material in the blood from damaged muscle tissue. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jason Wiese) Over-exertion leads to rhabdo
Rhabdomyolysis, a disease well-known to intense exercise circles, can be a painful and dangerous disease developed by doing what doctors have long recommended: exercising.Airmen must meet Air Force fitness standards with intense physical training, but Airmen should also be aware of the risk of rhabdo so they can remain healthy and continue to
0 8/19
2015
Lorri Welsh, 90th Missile Wing Protocol chief, briefs Col. Stephen M. Kravitky, 90th MW commander, Aug. 11, 2015, in his office on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., on the up-coming visit of the deputy chairman of the joint chief of staff  to F.E. Warren. The protocol office is in charge of providing behind the scenes support for formal ceremonies and distinguished visitor trips. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez/Released) Protocol puts wing's best foot forward
Historically military events have certain traditions and procedures that must be met. These range from resources the base offers to the position of the flag during a ceremony.On Warren, the 90th Missile Wing Protocol Office controls the reigns, showcasing the best Warren has to offer and ensuring events are handled properly.The Protocol Office
0 8/18
2015
From left to right, retired Col. Charles McGee and Lt. Cols. George Hardy, Harry Stewart and James Harvey III, four of the original Tuskegee Airmen, respond to a question about their military career during a presentation at the Cheyenne Civic Center, Cheyenne, Wyo., August 14, 2015. Out of the 354 Tuskegee pilots who flew in combat missions during World War II, only 21 remain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brandon Valle) Aviation pioneers speak with military, Cheyenne community
World War II led to a number of advancements in aviation that jump started the formation of the U.S. Air Force. Less than 40 years after the Wright brothers first achieved manned, powered, controlled flight, aviation was taken to a whole new level.Innovations in tactics, production, technology and culture provided huge forward strides in aviation.
0 8/17
2015
Ashleigh Street, 319th Missile Squadron key spouse, poses in her home April 5, 2015. Street and her fellow key spouses act as a liaison between military families and squadron leadership. (Courtesy photo) Get to know the key spouses: 319th MS
Editor's note: This article is part of an ongoing series of articles that will introduce key spouses from the various squadrons within the 90th Missile Wing.In a base focused on providing nuclear deterrence, the 90th Operations Group provides the manpower to accomplish the mission. Missileers spend much of their time out in the missile field, ready
0 8/14
2015
Key Spouse Graphic. (U.S. Air Force photos by Staff Sgt. Jamal D. Sutter/Released) Get to know key spouses: Ammie Welch and Rachel Wright, 90th CES
To achieve its mission of defending America with the world's premier, combat-ready ICBM force, the Mighty Ninety develops, trains and empowers both Airmen and their families.The 90th Civil Engineer Squadron has two key spouses to help reach CE families: Rachel Wright, spouse of Master Sgt. Don Wright, 90th CES engineering apprentice, and Ammie
0 8/11
2015
1 ... 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 73
RSS