News Search

Veterinarian ensures MWD bite is worse than bark

Staff Sgt. Craig Rainey, 78th Security Forces Military Working Dog Section, brings his MWD Macko in to the Robins Veterinary Treatment Facility, where Dr. (Capt) Adrienne Greenwood gives him a checkup. Active duty, National Guard, Reserve, retirees, 100 percent VA Medical and their family members may use the facility for their pets preventative care needs.

Staff Sgt. Craig Rainey, 78th Security Forces Military Working Dog Section, brings his MWD Macko in to the Robins Veterinary Treatment Facility, where Dr. (Capt) Adrienne Greenwood gives him a checkup. Active duty, National Guard, Reserve, retirees, 100 percent VA Medical and their family members may use the facility for their pets preventative care needs.

F.E WARREN AIR FORCE BASE, Wyo. --

Our nation employs more than human beings. There is an elite class of more than 2,500 military working dogs on duty worldwide. These dogs work around the clock, and it takes a team of veterinarians to ensure they remain fit-to-fight.

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Seth Williams, 90th Medical Group veterinary technician, spends countless hours with the numerous MWDs on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming. 

To ensure the MWDs are fit-to-fight, Williams visits the kennels monthly to check on building conditions, the dogs’ well-being, and to conduct training.

“I do simple medical training with the handlers,” said Williams. “They need to know the signs of heat exhaustion and how to handle potential injuries.”

Due to the size of the clinic, resources and services are limited. Therefore, Williams has to coordinate off-site care for the MWDs at The Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado, or Fort Carson, Colorado. The F.E. Warren Vet Clinic provides basic sick call and routine vaccines, but dogs requiring other services and emergencies are sent elsewhere.

“It would be great if we could have a military veterinarian here,” said Williams. “I know it is not possible due to the base population and current needs. So while I am here, I will provide the best service possible to all the animals I see with what is available, and I am always grateful when my supervisor can come up from the Academy and lend a hand.”

The MWDs are an investment to the base, and the military. On average the Air Force spends between $200,000 and $300,000 to get the dogs combat ready at their first base. However, without them being in top shape, Security Forces would not be able to do many of their jobs.

“Because of the MWDs we have on base, we can deter possible dangerous activity and detect contraband before they become an issue,” said Staff Sgt. Kyle Snape, 90th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler.

Thankfully the MWDs have everything they need to succeed at their job, in part due to Williams and the team of veterinarians looking after their care.

However, the clinic on base cares for more than MWDs. They care for house pets as well. Anyone able to receive care at the F.E. Warren Medical Clinic is eligible to receive care for their pets at the Veterinarian Clinic.

Be sure to schedule your pet’s appointment at 307-773-3354, and while you are there, remember to thank him for keeping the MWD fit-to-fight, and which keeps base more secure.